5 Ways Your Nonprofit Is Like a Hammerhead Shark

5 Things Your Nonprofit Has In Common With a Hammerhead Shark (3)

You’re probably wondering what hammerhead sharks have to do with digital marketing and fundraising.

Well, I wondered the same thing. But my desire to write a blog post about sharks won over logic and reason.

So… here are five ways your nonprofit is like a hammerhead shark:

1. You Both Possess Mutant-Like Eyeballs

Hammerhead

Hammerhead sharks can see almost 360 degrees. Nothing escapes their panoramic vision.

Similarly, using listening tools like Mention, BuzzSumo and Hootsuite,  gives you a broader and deeper understand of your people. Across all marketing channels.

2. You Both Refuel With Sources of High-Energy

Seals are like Cliff bars to the hammerhead shark. This diet gives them the energy they need to catch their next meal, which is usually more seals.

What’s your nonprofit’s energy source? Your people, and their stories, of course.

3. You Both Replace Your Old Teeth

Most sharks replace up to 1000 teeth in their lifetime. The reason is obvious. Crushing bone can wear and tear on the teeth, which often chip or even break off during an attack. Fresh new teeth enable shark to survive.

You keep your “teeth” fresh my measuring what’s working and what’s not, and eliminating the latter.

4. You Leave Your Babies to Fend For Themselves

Every time the female hammerhead gives birth,  she’ll have 20-40 cute little baby hammerhead sharks. Soon after the pain wears off, she will leave to fend for themselves.

In the same way, you raise successors who may not seem that capable, but will someday be way more capable than you.

It’s worth mentioning that the mother hammerhead may try to eat the slower pups.

5. You Both Need More Sleep

Hammerhead Pew

Hammerhead sharks must swim to breath. The constant movement forces water through their gills, oxygenating their blood. They will actually suffocate if they stop swimming.

Don’t be like the hammerhead. Go outside. Get more sleep.

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John Haydon