How service sells in the Trust Tree

redwood-trunkI read an interesting post on Danny Brown’s site about his experience with a WordPress plug-in called Wapple.

The short version is that Danny installed the plug-in and it pooped on his blog so he removed it. Shortly after, he received an email from Rich Guppy of Wapple who asked why it was removed. Rich took the time to open the hood on Danny’s blog and fix the problem – an errant comment – and made sure Danny had the latest version of Wapple so that his blog would look great on mobile phones.

Product reviews vs. service reviews

If I want to read a review of a product, I’ll go to amazon.com or an industry blog. But where can I find reviews of service – from people I trust? Not in forums, unless that’s been my home for a while.

The trust tree

OldSchool50.jpeg

I think of the web as a tree where the trunk is a community’s set of common goals and interests. The branches and leaves are blogs,  Twitter and Facebook. The sun, water and nutrients are what we share with each other.

The folks in my tree share great products. But I’m noticing that, more and more, my friends are sharing good experiences with the servicing of those products. Maybe that’s because my tree is passionate about service. We understand how powerful it can be.

The spinning commodity cycle

salt shakerProducts will continue to spin faster and faster within a commodity cycle:

  • Phase One – Totally unique when first released
  • Phase Two – One big competitor comes along and stirs things up. Droid vs. iPhone
  • Phase Three – The salt phase. Morton vs. North American Salt. BFD.

How are companies seeking to differential themselves today? Service.

And who is talking about great service experiences? Everyone.

And how many friends do they tell? Millions.

How do you sell with service?

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John Haydon